Explore The NRA Universe Of Websites

APPEARS IN Legal & Legislation

Iowa: Bipartisan Firearms Legislation Dies as Senate Refuses to Act

Friday, June 5, 2015

Iowa: Bipartisan Firearms Legislation Dies as Senate Refuses to Act

Despite months of work by NRA, the Iowa Firearms Coalition (IFC), a group of dedicated bipartisan legislators and law enforcement representatives, the Iowa Senate has failed Iowans once again, and turned a blind eye to much needed improvements in Iowa law.  The House added the pro-gun provisions from Senate File 427 to the standings bill Senate File 510, as previously reported.  Unfortunately, Senate Leadership refused to allow the measure to move forward with those provisions included. Since the Senate refused to bring up any of the individual firearms omnibus bills containing similar provisions (HF 527, SF425, SF427), the "standings" bill was the last chance this session. 

The 2015 Legislative Session began with Senate Leadership promising that Iowans would be put ahead of partisan politics. However, yet another session has ended with a false promise from Senate Leadership.  For years, Iowans have been told "we will do it next year" when it comes to to firearms policy.  Unsurprisingly, that line has been thrown around again, with the hopes that constituents will forget the promises made.

When Iowa's "shall issue" law was hurriedly passed in 2010, it became clear that the process for renewals outlined in the legislation was flawed, and would cause a large burden on both permit holders and law enforcement.  NRA, IFC and Second Amendment supporters were promised by senate leadership that this issue would be addressed prior to the first permits being issued in Iowa in January of 2016.  This session was the legislature's final opportunity to solve these issues. Despite pleas from law enforcement and Second Amendment advocates, the Senate chose to block the solution proposed by these groups, and refused to even hear these time sensitive portions of the 2015 Omnibus Bill. For details on the language, click here

The legislation under consideration this year would have:

  • Strengthened penalties for “straw purchases,” the practice where someone who is prohibited from having a firearm obtains one by having another person purchase
  • Legalized ownership and possession of firearm sound suppressors. Currently illegal to own under Iowa law, suppressors are legal to own under federal law and in 41 states.  While they do not eliminate the sound of a firearm, suppressors do reduce the muzzle report of the gun much in the same way that a muffler reduces exhaust noise from a car or truck. -- There are numerous benefits associated with the use of suppressors.  These benefits include increased accuracy due to reduced recoil and muzzle blast, protection from hearing damage and reduced noise pollution.  Noise complaints are frequently used as an excuse to close shooting ranges, informal shooting areas and hunting lands throughout the country.  Increased use of suppressors will help to eliminate many of these complaints and protect hunting and shooting areas well into the future.
  • Created a training exception for veterans of the Armed Forces from ever having to go through initial training or retraining if they can produce their military qualifications at the time of application.
  • Removed the arbitrary age prohibition on the use and possession of a handgun or handgun ammunition.  Under current law, if a parent wishes to teach their child to shoot a long gun, they can, but they are currently prohibited from teaching a child under fourteen how to use a pistol or revolver.  This change allows parents to make the decision of when a child is mature and strong enough to be taught firearm safety. 
  • Allowed law enforcement to verify 24/7 by electronic means the validity of a concealed weapons permit through a statewide verification system. This new system would have helped Iowa gain reciprocity with other states. However, this system is not a gun registry or database of firearm owners, but simply contains information that verifies if a permit is valid or not.  It would not include information on specific firearms you own, or information on individuals who own firearms but do not have a permit.
  • Created uniform permits throughout the state that only contain necessary information on the card.  This would have applied to both a permit to carry and an optional permit to acquire.  Permits would no longer list a person’s home address on the card.

While it is certainly disappointing that the Iowa Senate has once again failed supporters of firearms freedoms, it is imperative that you remain involved in the process to bring change to this pattern!  Please contact Senate Leadership and share your disappointment over their inaction.

Contact information for Senate Leadership can be found here.

TRENDING NOW
What You Need to Know about ATF’s New eForms System

News  

Monday, January 10, 2022

What You Need to Know about ATF’s New eForms System

On December 23, ATF launched a new system for applicants to complete various forms that ATF is responsible for administrating. For most gun owners, this change will primarily impact how applications for firearms regulated under ...

Indiana: House Passes Lawful Carry, Sends To Senate

Wednesday, January 12, 2022

Indiana: House Passes Lawful Carry, Sends To Senate

Yesterday, the House voted 64-29 to pass House Bill 1077, the lawful carry bill. It will now go to the Senate for further consideration.

Washington: Another Year – Another Extreme Gun Ban!

Friday, January 14, 2022

Washington: Another Year – Another Extreme Gun Ban!

The legislature only just gaveled in this week and anti-gun legislators and gun control groups couldn’t wait to reintroduce their extreme gun ban legislation - an "assault weapons" ban, Senate Bill 5217.

Washington:  The Hits Keep on Coming as Magazine Ban Pulled to the Senate Floor

Friday, January 14, 2022

Washington: The Hits Keep on Coming as Magazine Ban Pulled to the Senate Floor

On Friday, the Washington Senate pulled magazine ban legislation, Senate Bill 5078 to the Senate Floor where it is eligible for a vote for passage.

Guide To The Interstate Transportation Of Firearms

Gun Laws  

Thursday, January 1, 2015

Guide To The Interstate Transportation Of Firearms

CAUTION: Federal and state firearms laws are subject to frequent change. This summary is not to be considered as legal advice or a restatement of law.

Canada, Six Months from “Confiscation Day”

News  

Monday, November 8, 2021

Canada, Six Months from “Confiscation Day”

In early 2020, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced his so-called “assault weapon” ban along with a temporary amnesty period that allows the owners of newly-banned firearms to possess their property without incurring criminal liability. Canadians affected ...

Vermont:  Bad Gun Bill Could Become Worse in House Committee

Wednesday, January 12, 2022

Vermont: Bad Gun Bill Could Become Worse in House Committee

Things are bad enough in Vermont that the Legislature had to resort to meeting virtually instead of in-person.

Anti-Gun Provisions Dropped from House-Passed NDAA

News  

Wednesday, December 8, 2021

Anti-Gun Provisions Dropped from House-Passed NDAA

Yesterday, the U.S. House of Representatives approved a revised version of the FY22 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA), the annual defense bill that directs funding for our nation’s military. The two anti-gun provisions that were included ...

Georgia: 2022 Legislative Session Convenes Today

Monday, January 10, 2022

Georgia: 2022 Legislative Session Convenes Today

Today, January 10th, the Georgia Legislature begins the 2022 legislative session. Last week, Governor Brian Kemp announced his support for constitutional carry. Currently, 21 states allow law-abiding adults to carry a concealed handgun for self-defense without having to ...

Guide To The Interstate Transportation Of Firearms

Gun Laws  

Monday, June 30, 2014

Guide To The Interstate Transportation Of Firearms

CAUTION: Federal and state firearms laws are subject to frequent change. This summary is not to be considered as legal advice or a restatement of law.

MORE TRENDING +
LESS TRENDING -

More Like This From Around The NRA

NRA ILA

Established in 1975, the Institute for Legislative Action (ILA) is the "lobbying" arm of the National Rifle Association of America. ILA is responsible for preserving the right of all law-abiding individuals in the legislative, political, and legal arenas, to purchase, possess and use firearms for legitimate purposes as guaranteed by the Second Amendment to the U.S. Constitution.