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Indiana Voter Registration Information

Friday, December 9, 2011

Primary Election
May 8, 2012

Primary Election Voter Registration Deadline

April 9, 2012

General Election

November 6, 2012

General Election Voter Registration Deadline
October 9, 2012

Voter Registration and Eligibility
Must register to vote 29 days before the election.
Can select party affiliation at the polls.

QUALIFICATIONS

To register to vote in the state of Indiana an individual must meet the following qualifications:

  • Be a citizen of the United States
  • Be at least 18 years old on the day of the next general or municipal election
  • Have lived in your precinct for at least 30 days before the next election (except for certain military voters)
  • Not currently be imprisoned after being convicted of a crime

OBTAINING A VOTER REGISTRATION FORM

You may register to vote by applying at a variety of places: your county voter registration office, Circuit Court Clerk Office, any license branch or public assistance office. You may register to vote in Indiana by mail on a simple, pre-addressed card that you can pick up at public libraries, license branches,  public secondary schools or local government offices. Mail-in registration forms are also included with Indiana income tax return forms.

Register to vote online:

Print a voter registration form here.


INDIANA ABSENTEE BALLOTS

Who Can Absentee Vote in Indiana?

Any registered voter may vote by absentee ballot in person at the County election board beginning 29 days before Election Day.

In order to be mailed an absentee ballot, the voter must meet one of the following requirements:

  • Have a specific, reasonable expectation of being absent from the county on election day during the entire 12 hours that the polls are open (6am until 6pm)
  • Be a voter with disabilities.
  • Be a voter at least 65 years of age
  • Have official election duties outside your voting precinct
  • Scheduled to work during the entire 12 hours that the polls are open
  • Confined to a residence, health care facility, or hospital due to illness or injury during the entire 12 hours that the polls are open
  • Caring for an individual confined to a residence, health care facility, or hospital due to illness or injury during the entire 12 hours that the polls are open
  • Unable to vote at the polls in person due to observance of a religious discipline or religious holiday during the entire 12 hours the polls are open
  • Address confidentiality program participant in the program administered by the Indiana Attorney General under IC 5-26.5-1-6

How Can I Acquire an Absentee Ballot?

On-Site Absentee Voting: If a voter is interested in voting absentee in person, he should apply for and vote an absentee ballot in the County Circuit Court Clerk's Office (the application and ballot may be completed in the same visit). Absentee voting in the Clerk's Office begins 29 days before an election, and will be available on at least two Saturdays before Election Day. The deadline for applying and voting at the County Election Board is noon on the day before an election.

Absentee Voting by Mail: If interested in voting absentee by mail, the voter must complete an absentee ballot application and return it to the County Election Board (at the Clerk's office). Applications from most voters must be received, by mail or FAX at least eight days before Election Day. If the voter lives in Marion County is: a confined voter, a voter caring for a confined individual, a military voter or an overseas voter, there are special requirements that apply. For more information, voters should contact their County Election Board or County Clerk.

When the county election board receives the application for a mail-in absentee ballot, they will process it if the application is approved, mail the voter an absentee ballot for the upcoming election.

Obtain an application for absentee ballot online here.

Additional Information for Overseas Voters

How do I Return the Absentee Ballot and What is the Deadline?

The completed ballot may be returned by mail to the County Election Board. The ballot may also be hand delivered by: the voter, a member of the voter's household or the voter's attorney . Ballots must be received by the Election Board at the Clerk's Office in time to be processed for the election. It is recommended that absentee ballots be returned to the clerk's office no later than noon on Election Day.

Source of information:
Indiana Election Division
302 W Washington St, Room E-204
Indianapolis, Indiana 46204-2743
Phone: 317-232-3939
Phone: 800-622-4941
Phone:866-IN-1-VOTE
E-mail: elections@iec.in.gov

http://www.in.gov/sos/elections/2398.htm

PROTECT YOUR SECOND AMENDMENT RIGHTS
BY EXERCISING YOUR RIGHT TO VOTE! 

 

IN THIS ARTICLE
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