New Pro-Gun Laws in Virginia Take Effect this Sunday

Posted on June 29, 2012

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After another successful legislative session this year in Richmond, law-abiding Virginians will see many important advances in their Second Amendment rights. 

The following bills passed in the Virginia General Assembly and signed into law by Governor Bob McDonnell will go into effect on Sunday, July 1:

Senate Bill 563, introduced by state Senator Frank Ruff(R-15), allows for the submission of an initial concealed handgun permit application via U.S. mail and also restricts the clerk and the circuit court from requesting or requiring any information from an applicant other than that which is allowed on the concealed handgun permit application. 

House Bill 22, introduced by Delegate Mark Cole (R-88), establishes that no locality or entity may participate in a gun “buyback” program where individuals are given anything of value or money in exchange for surrendering a firearm to the locality, unless the governing body adheres to a strict procedure. Such procedure requires the governing body to first pass an ordinance authorizing the gun “buyback” and also requires that any locality holding gun "buybacks" must sell the firearms to a federally licensed firearms dealer “or be disposed of” in an appropriate manner if they cannot be sold.

House Bill 940 and Senate Bill 323, introduced by Delegate L. Scott Lingamfelter (R-31) and state Senator Bill Carrico (R-40) respectively, repeals the prohibition on purchasing more than one handgun per month (gun rationing).

House Bill 20 and Senate Bill 245, introduced by Delegate Tony Wilt (R-26) and state Senator Mark Obenshain (R-26), updates the Emergency Powers statute by adding lawful carrying and transportation to the list of actions that cannot be prohibited during a declaration of emergency.

House Bill 26, introduced by Delegate Mark Cole (R-88), allows a court to waive a $25 dollar fine upon presentation of the permit to the court, if a person fails to display his concealed handgun permit when requested by a law enforcement officer.

House Bill 375, introduced by state Delegate Brenda Pogge (R-96), strengthens the state firearms preemption law by prohibiting local governments from enacting or enforcing workplace rules that prevent an employee of that locality from storing a lawfully possessed firearm or ammunition in their locked personal motor vehicle.

House Bill 754 and Senate Bill 67, introduced by Delegate Ben Cline (R-24) and state Senator Bill Stanley (R-20) respectively, removes the option for a locality to require an applicant for a concealed handgun permit to submit fingerprints with the initial application.

Thank you for contacting your state legislators and thus helping get these significant pro-gun bills enacted this year.

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